Archive for the 'writing conferences' Category

Five Reasons to Attend the Writer’s Digest Biz of Publishing Conference Next Weekend!

1) You’ll learn the ins and outs of marketing and promoting your writing.

2) You’ll start building relationships for long-term success.

3) You’ll move your career online.

4) You’ll get a one-on-one meeting with a WD editor to help you assess where you are in your career.

5) You’ll learn nuts-and-bolts information not covered in most writing conferences.

And the sixth reason: to hang with me! I’ll be speaking and you can use my discount code to get $50 dollars off! (Code: KatS8)

For a full description of the conference, visit the website.

Register for the whole weekend or individual days.

Hope to see you at the Friday night poetry slam too!

The Writer’s Digest Business of Getting Published Conference

Join my in New York this September. Use my discount code for $50 off!
Use my discount code for $50 off! Code: KatS8

The Writer’s Digest Business of Getting Published Conference is designed to guide any author through the new dynamics of today’s publishing world.  This three-day event takes place Friday, September 18, through Sunday, September 20, 2009, at the New York Marriott Marquis, on Times Square in New York.
Chris Brogan, social media genius, is the keynote speaker.

Other speakers include Kassia Krozser, editor/publisher of BookSquare.com;  David Mathison, whose online sales success is the new business model;  Mike Shatzkin, the industry’s top publishing consultant, Seth Harwood and Scott Sigler, whose own podcasts and videocasts have made them superstars in the business;  and many more, plus the editors of Writer’s Digest!

Complete program information, including speaker bios, special events related to the conference and registration, is now available here.

With emphasis on platform, networking and social media, The Writer’s Digest Conference is an innovative and ground-breaking conference, featuring the industry’s top forward-thinking speakers, leading sessions on topics relevant to the current and future state of the publishing world.

The Writer’s Digest Business of Getting Published Conference

The Writer’s Digest Business of Getting Published Conference is designed to guide any author through the new dynamics of today’s publishing world.  This three-day event takes place Friday, September 18, through Sunday, September 20, 2009, at the New York Marriott Marquis, on Times Square in New York.

With emphasis on platform, networking and social media, The Writer’s Digest Conference is an innovative and ground-breaking conference, featuring the industry’s top forward-thinking speakers, leading sessions on topics relevant to the current and future state of the publishing world.

Chris Brogan, social media genius, is the keynote speaker.  

Other speakers include Kassia Krozser, editor/publisher of BookSquare.com;  David Mathison, whose online sales success is the new business model;  Mike Shatzkin, the industry’s top publishing consultant, Seth Harwood and Scott Sigler, whose own podcasts and videocasts have made them superstars in the business;  and many more, plus the editors of Writer’s Digest!

Complete program information, including speaker bios, special events related to the conference and registration, is now available here.

The WDB/BEA Writers Conference: Part Two

During lunch at the conference, we had a real treat. Blake Synder, author of Save the Cat, The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need, was the speaker. He was terrific. Funny, entertaining and interesting. Just what a conference attendee needs right after lunch!

I had a chance to chat with Blake later over dinner and he is just as approachable and endearing one-on-one as he is in front of a crowd of hundreds. He also gave me some great tips about how to make the transition from Writer Mama to the author of Get Known Before the Book Deal (which is for all writers).

Thanks, Blake! Be sure to check out his blog and books for screenwriters.

After lunch, I attended Jane Friedman’s talk on The Times They Are A-Changin’: Being a Successful Author Amidst Transformational Change in Book Publishing. Jane is my editor for Get Known Before the Book Deal and she is the Editorial Director of Writer’s Digest Books and many of the other F+W imprints (F+W is the parent company of Writer’s Digest Books).

I’ll tell you what that talk gave me some serious food for thought. But what I walked away with for my readers and students is the same old thing I have been focused on this past year: the future belongs to writers who have and grow a platform. That’s all there is to it.

When I think of the authors I know who are the most successful, the secret of their success is equivalent to the time, energy and money they invest in getting known and staying known. At this time, the publishing industry is changing and fast. But the way it impacts us is that we have to become more well-rounded. Not just good writers but good at everything related to a writing career.

I’m referring to writing, editing, selling, self-promotion, and long-term planning. Any one of these is simply not enough. We each have to either master them all or hire people who can do a better job for us.

The thing is (and this came up during my presentation), you can always hire help AFTER you become an author but no one can discover your best platform but you. You have to do that work (I pretty much lay out how in Get Known). After that, everything that follows is a lot easier.

More about the conference to come…

The WDB/BEA Conference: Part One

On Wednesday, I attended the Writer’s Digest/BEA Writers Conference, which was excellent. I highly recommend this conference to anyone who has never interacted with agents before and wants a chance to pitch agents verbally. Whether your idea is fully developed or still brewing, you can assess whether or not you are on track by paying attention to how interested agents are about your idea.

Several people asked me if they should pitch and my response was always, “Yes, you should definitely pitch.” If nothing else, once you’ve pitched once, it’s a lot easier next time. And on the other end of the spectrum, one attendee told me she had nine requests for her proposal.

After the keynote with Jacquelyn Mitchard, I gave my breakout session on Get Known While You Sleep—A Platform Primer. Attendance was great and even though I really hammered home the message that writers must produce themselves every step of the way on the path to authorhood, everyone seemed to get and accept this reality and no one wanted to argue with me. (Darn.)

(Of course, I was preaching to the choir because by the time writers show up at a writers conference they tend to be pretty motivated. But bring on anyone who wants to argue the point, because I’ve got 80,000 words of preparation behind me!)

Many people came up to me throughout the day and thanked me for the presentation. (And this is my chance to thank them. Thank you! Your feedback is extremely valuable.)

Next, I attended Bill O’Hanlon’s session on Effective Use of the Internet for Authors, which was very inspiring and informative. Talk about an author who is making the most that the Internet has to offer and that is Bill O’Hanlon. His latest book is Write is a Verb, Sit Down. Start writing. No Excuses., which comes with an hour-long motivational DVD. You can download an excerpt here.

Stay tuned…my day at the Writer’s Digest/BEA Writers Conference to be continued. I’m still catching up from being gone in the middle of the week last week.

“Good morning, Mommy” music to my ears: My LA Trip

I had a wonderful, though swift, trip to Los Angeles this week in the midst of wrapping up two classes, starting a new class (Craft a Saleable Nonfiction Book Proposal starts Wednesday), finishing my rewrite of Get Known Before the Book Deal and juggling a lot of personal/home details.

Here’s the abrreviated recap:

Getting on the road: This is always the hardest part for me (see my earlier post on the speed bumps of leaving home). But typically, once I get dropped off at the airport, assuming I didn’t forget anything, I can finally relax and enjoy my trip. This trip was no exception. And may I take this opportunity to say that Portland, Oregon has one of the nicest airports you will ever see.

Flying: I adore flying. Some of my best ideas come to me on airplanes. Once air-bound, I can thoroughly relax and enjoy myself. I can’t address the pile of laundry or dishes in the sink from thousands of feet in the air, so I get to chill out instead. (I typically peruse People magazine, a treat reserved for visits to the chiropractor at home.)

Arriving in LA: When LA photographer Mark Bennington was here, I teased him about living in LA. But after my trip, I feel contrite. My LA experience was so wonderful and so thoroughly enjoyable that I want to shout from the rooftops: “Don’t judge LA by the traffic jams!” (However, a few locals did comment on the stress related to bad traffic and congestion, something that is easier to forgive when you are just there for a few days.)

Bad Habit: When I am presenting I absolutely need peace and quiet to prepare myself the night before. On other trips with my family along, this has proven difficult. I am a presentation tweaker. I will stay up way too late the night before tweaking and re-tweaking my presentation. Usually with positive results…which is why this has become a “bad” habit. I’m tired the next day but I can’t sleep well in hotels by myself anyway, no matter how wonderful they are. My hotel on this trip was brand new and the nicest I’ve seen. We’re talkin’ gorgeous! And right on Sunset Boulevard, where yes, I did indeed bump into a celebrity. To respect her privacy, I won’t say where.

Rolling computer bag ideas? I need a rolling bag for my computer that is compact enough to use as a carry-on and hold my other plane items. Does anyone have any suggestions? I hurt my shoulder dragging around my Mac laptop every time I speak. Surely there’s got to be a better way…anyone?

Stay tuned…more to come!

Thank You and a Gold Star for the SCBWI-Oregon Conference

What a lovely conference I attended on Saturday. The conference was well-organized, well attended and featured excellent faculty and topics.

And despite the fact that a few things went awry (that were basically things I should have followed up on in advance), I had a wonderful time at the annual SCBWI-Oregon conference and connected with a great bunch of fellow writers.

One thing I have heard about children’s writers lately is that until J K Rowling came along with Harry, they had been left alone in their own little “sandbox” to do their own thing. (Someone else used this term and I thought it was charming.)

I guess I think that this is kind of a shame. Since I benefited from attending the conference, and I’m not a children’s writer, I wonder if more writers wouldn’t learn about interesting options they might not know about and vice-versa. Would children’s writers benefit from attending general conferences?

For example, in Oregon we have the SCBWI-Oregon conference and the Willamette Writers conference. I know I’m not the only one attending both. Does anyone else have anything to add about the benefits of participating in both?

I’ll report more on the conference as the week goes on. It’s another whopper of a week for me. And next week, I’m off to L.A!


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